John Campen

mlee525:

texturism:

“I always had this idea that doing art was just a masturbatory activity, and didn’t really help anybody. I was teaching kids in the California Youth Authority, an honor camp where they send kids instead of sending them to prison. One kid came to me one day and asked if I would open up the arts and crafts building at night so they could work. I said, “If all of you guys will cool it in the classes, then I’ll baby-sit you.” Worked like a charm. Here were these kids that had no values I could embrace, that cared about art more than I. So, I said, “Well, I guess art has some function in society,” and I haven’t gotten beyond that yet, but it was enough to convince me that art did some good somehow. I just needed a reason that wasn’t all about myself.”
- John Baldessari

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mlee525:

texturism:

“I always had this idea that doing art was just a masturbatory activity, and didn’t really help anybody. I was teaching kids in the California Youth Authority, an honor camp where they send kids instead of sending them to prison. One kid came to me one day and asked if I would open up the arts and crafts building at night so they could work. I said, “If all of you guys will cool it in the classes, then I’ll baby-sit you.” Worked like a charm. Here were these kids that had no values I could embrace, that cared about art more than I. So, I said, “Well, I guess art has some function in society,” and I haven’t gotten beyond that yet, but it was enough to convince me that art did some good somehow. I just needed a reason that wasn’t all about myself.”

John Baldessari

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(via notational)

See good in everything and in everyone. But love only a few fiercely and determinately. Make them heroes. Find patterns among them. Stage hypothetical conversations, debates, between them. Have inspiration outside what you do. The way you do anything is the way you do everything. And if you want to be pushed, have heroes in anything, everywhere.

On heroes and the architecture of character.  (via explore-blog)

Reblogged from Explore

One of the most satisfying experiences I know is just fully to appreciate an individual in the same way I appreciate a sunset. When I look at a sunset, I don’t find myself saying, “Soften the orange a little on the right hand corner, and put a bit more purple in the cloud color” — I don’t try to control a sunset. I watch it with awe as it unfolds. It is this receptive, open attitude which is necessary to truly perceive something as it is.

Carl Rogers (via oatmealcakes)

(via notational)

Source moonrisepizza

Reblogged from daydreaming

Here is Patsy Rodenburg again.  She is talking about her work with what she calls Second Circle.  After watching this talk, I ordered her book on said subject.  It has revolutionized the way I teach and perform.  Patsy is right.  Any person, no matter how introverted, shy, awkward, etc. has “It” in them if they are only given fertile ground in which they have opportunities to experiment and grow.

Where Greatness Grows

To be out at the front of things frequently means being a bit more alone.   I keep thinking of cyclists in the Tour de France.  Even the riders with the household names travel in the peloton for a good chunk of the race.  There comes a point, though, where the great ones must break free from the pack and set off on their own.  You can strive to be great or you can draft off of the pack, but at some point you must choose one of them.   While it may be sparsely populated out front and you have no one’s wake to pull you along, the unencumbered views and the stillness of that place make it worth the solitary journey.  

Well that, and the hope of greatness.

Votre toast

The composer Georges Bizet knows how to party like a bull fighter.  Here’s some audio of me singing what Bizet has to say about it.

Source SoundCloud / Johnny Campen